Rhode Island Medical Power of Attorney Form

Rhode Island medical power of attorney is used by an individual to permit someone else to make decisions regarding their health care. Through this document, the appointed decision maker (the “agent”) receives authorization to communicate the principal’s health care choices to doctors and other medical professionals, even if the principal is too ill to make decisions on their own.

Rhode Island Medical Power of Attorney Form

Rhode Island medical power of attorney is used by an individual to permit someone else to make decisions regarding their health care. Through this document, the appointed decision maker (the “agent”) receives authorization to communicate the principal’s health care choices to doctors and other medical professionals, even if the principal is too ill to make decisions on their own.

Last updated May 16th, 2024

Rhode Island medical power of attorney is used by an individual to permit someone else to make decisions regarding their health care. Through this document, the appointed decision maker (the “agent”) receives authorization to communicate the principal’s health care choices to doctors and other medical professionals, even if the principal is too ill to make decisions on their own.

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Signing Requirements

Rhode Island law requires that a medical power of attorney be either notarized or signed by two adult witnesses.[1] Neither of the witnesses can be:

  • Named in the power of attorney as an agent or alternate agent.
  • A health care provider or employee of a health care provider.
  • An operator of a community care facility or the operator’s employee.

Anyone who stands to inherit from the principal’s estate or is related to the principal cannot act as the notary or one of the witnesses.

Power of Attorney (Preview)

Rhode Island Medical Power Of Attorney

Legal Definition

“Durable power of attorney” means a witnessed document executed in accordance with the requirements of § 23-4.10-2.[2]

Revocation

An individual can revoke their agent’s authority by communicating an intent to revoke, either verbally or in writing, to the attending physician, any health care provider, or emergency medical service personnel.[3]