Rental Lease Agreement Templates (11)

A lease agreement is a legally binding document that allows a tenant to occupy property and pay rent to a landlord. It is commonly written after both parties agree to the terms and conditions of a tenancy arrangement. After a lease is signed, the tenant can move in on the start date.

Rental Lease Agreement Templates (11)

A lease agreement is a legally binding document that allows a tenant to occupy property and pay rent to a landlord. It is commonly written after both parties agree to the terms and conditions of a tenancy arrangement. After a lease is signed, the tenant can move in on the start date.

Last updated February 2nd, 2024

A lease agreement is a legally binding document that allows a tenant to occupy property and pay rent to a landlord. It is commonly written after both parties agree to the terms and conditions of a tenancy arrangement. After a lease is signed, the tenant can move in on the start date.

By State

By Type (11)

Standard Residential Lease Agreement – The most popular type of lease. A fixed-term contract for renting out property for a few months to a year or more.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Commercial Lease Agreement – For any type of non-residential use such as retail, office, or industrial space.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Condominium Lease Agreement – For a residential unit located in a condominium association.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Equipment Lease Agreement – To rent tools or heavy machinery.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Month-to-Month Rental Agreement – Also known as a “tenancy at will,” this rental arrangement continues until either the landlord or tenant gives notice to the other (30 days notice is the more common notice period).

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Rent-to-Own Agreement (Lease-Option) – Allows a tenant to purchase a rented property under predetermined terms and conditions.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Roommate Agreement – Establishes financial and social rules between tenants sharing the same apartment or house.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Simple (1-Page) Lease Agreement – For setting a basic rental arrangement between a landlord and tenant.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Sublease Agreement – Allows a tenant who has a lease to rent (sublet) a portion or the entirety of their rental unit to someone else.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Short-Term / Vacation Lease Agreement – A basic rental arrangement for short-term stays.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Weekly (week-to-week) Rental Agreement – An “at-will” arrangement that can be terminated by giving seven (7) days’ notice.

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

How to Lease a Residence (10 steps)

Quick Facts

  • 35.2% of the USA households rent.[1]
  • 59% of tenants have at least 1 pet.[2]
  • 71% of tenants visit 1 to 4 properties before renting.[3]
  • 74% of tenants search for property on a mobile phone.[4]

1. Marketing / Finding a Residence

As a landlord, taking great photos is the most important part of a listing. 23% of tenants in 2022 admitted to signing a lease without viewing the property in-person.[5]

2. Schedule a Showing

When scheduling a showing, it’s recommended to do so when the tenant isn’t home and to make sure is clean.

3. Screening the Tenant

It is recommended to run a consumer report on an applicant that includes their credit report, verifying employment, and a general search of public records. It is common to charge an applicant a non-refundable fee to generate this report.

4. Approving or Rejecting the Tenant

After reviewing the tenant’s credit report, criminal history, and verifying references, it’s time to make a decision.

If rejected, the landlord will be required to send the applicant an Adverse Action (Rejection) Letter mentioning the reasons for refusal and where they can get a copy of the consumer reports generated.

5. Negotiating

When negotiating a lease, it is a reminder that affordability is the most common negotiating point of a lease for 80% of renters.[6]

6. Signing the Lease

Signing a lease ensures that both parties are legally bound to the tenancy. In 2022, 36% of leases were signed electronically, and 55% were signed in person (8% were unsigned).[7]

7.  Taking Occupancy

After the lease is signed and the security deposit and first month’s rent have cleared, the tenant can move-in on the 1st day of lease term.

8. Paying Rent

56% of tenants pay their rent online and 68% of those who don’t pay online, would prefer an online option.[9]

9. Renewing / Terminating the Lease

At the end of the lease, the landlord must decide whether to lease the property to the tenant again.

10. Returning the Security Deposit

The landlord is required to return the security deposit. A landlord will commonly inspect the property and deduct any repairs from the amount.

Landlord-Tenant Laws

Rent Grace Periods & Late Fees

STATE GRACE PERIOD LATE RENT NSF FEE
Alabama No grace period No maximum $30 (§ 8-8-15(b))
Alaska No grace period No maximum $30 (AS 09.68.115(a)(2))
Arizona No grace period No maximum $25 plus any bank fees incurred (§ 44-6852)
Arkansas No grace period No maximum $30 plus any bank fees incurred (§ 18-17-701(b))
California No grace period No maximum; landlords are advised not to charge more than the reasonable estimate of costs incurred (Tenant-Landlord Guide (p. 39)) $25 for the first bounced check and $35 for each subsequent check (CIV § 1719(a)(1))
Colorado 7 days (§ 38-12-105(1)(a)) $50 or 5% of the past due amount, whichever is greater (§ 38-12-105(1)(b), (c)) $20 (§ 13-21-109(1)(b)(I))
Connecticut 9 days (§ 47a-15a) No maximum; late fees must be fair and reflect actual expenses (CGA) No statute
Delaware 5 days (§ 5501(d)) 5% of rent amount (§ 5501(d)) $40 (§ 1301A(a)(2))
Florida No grace period No maximum 5% or a flat fee (based on check value) (§ 68.065(2))
Georgia No grace period No maximum $30 or 5% of the check, whichever is greater, plus bank fees (§ 13-6-15(b))
Hawaii No grace period 8% of rent amount (§ 521-21(f)) $30 (§ 490:3-506.5)
Idaho No grace period No maximum 12% interest and $20 fee (§ 28-22-105)
Illinois No grace period No maximum $25 (810 ILCS 5/3-806)
Indiana No grace period No maximum $25 (§ 24-4.5-7-202)
Iowa No grace period $12/day (rent $700 or less) or $20/day (rent over $700) (§ 562A.9(4)) No statute
Kansas No grace period (§ 58-2545(c)) No maximum $30 (§ 60-2610(g))
Kentucky No grace period (§ 383.565(2)) No maximum $50 (§ 514.040(4)(b))
Louisiana No grace period No maximum $25 fee or 5% of the check amount, whichever is greater (§ 9:2782(B))
Maine 15 days (§ 6028(1)) 4% of rent amount (§ 6028(2)) No statute
Maryland No grace period (§ 8-401) 5% of rent amount (§ 8-208(d)(3)) No statute
Massachusetts 30 days (§ 186:15B(1)(c)) No maximum No statute
Michigan No grace period No maximum $25 if paid within 7 days; $35 if paid within 30 days (§ 600.2952(3))
Minnesota No grace period 8% of rent amount (§ 504B.177(a)) $30 (§ 604.113 Subd. 2(a))
Mississippi No grace period No maximum No statute
Missouri No grace period No maximum No statute
Montana No grace period (§ 70-24-201(2)) No maximum $30 (§ 27-1-717(2))
Nebraska No grace period (§ 76-1414(3)) No maximum $10 plus bank fees (§ 28-611(5))
Nevada 3 days (§ 118A.210(4)(a)) 5% of rent amount (§ 118A.210(4)(b)) No statute
New Hampshire No grace period No maximum If notice is given, tenant must pay the rent amount plus bank fees and mailing costs within 10 days (§ 544-B:1(I)(b))
New Jersey No grace period generally; 5 days for senior citizens (§§ 2A:42-6.12A:42-6.3) No maximum No statute
New Mexico No grace period 10% of rent amount (§ 47-8-15(D)) No statute
New York 5 days (§ 238-A(2)) $50 or 5% of rent amount, whichever is less (§ 238-A(2)) $20 (§ 5-328(2)(a))
North Carolina 5 days (§ 42-46(a)) $15 or 5% of rent amount, whichever is greater (§ 42-46(a)(1),(2)) No statute
North Dakota No grace period No maximum $40 (§ 6-08-16(2)(a))
Ohio No grace period No maximum No statute
Oklahoma No grace period No maximum No statute
Oregon 4 days (§ 90.260(1)(a)) Reasonable flat fee, 6% of flat fee daily, or 5% of rent amount per 5 days (§ 90.260(2)) $35 plus interest accrued at legal rate of interest (§§ 30.701(2),(5), 82.010)
Pennsylvania No grace period No maximum No statute
Rhode Island No grace period No maximum No statute
South Carolina No grace period (§ 27-40-310(c)) No maximum $30 (§ 34-11-70(a))
South Dakota No grace period No maximum No statute
Tennessee 5 days (§ 66-28-201(d)) 10% of rent amount (§ 66-28-201(d)) No statute
Texas 2 days (§ 92.019(a)) 12% or 10% of rent amount, depending on number of rental units (§ 92.019(a-1)(1)) No statute
Utah No grace period 10% of rent amount of $75, whichever is greater (§ 57-22-4(5)(a)) $20 (§§ 7-15-1(5)7-15-2(2))
Vermont No grace period (§ 4455(a)) If written in the lease, late fee can’t be more than actual expenses incurred (Handbook) No statute
Virginia 5 days (§ 55.1-1204(C)(5)) 10% of rent amount or 10% of amount remaining, whichever is less (§ 55.1-1204(E)) $50 plus interest and bank fees (§ 8.01-27.1(A))
Washington 5 days (§ 59.18.170(2)) No maximum No statute
West Virginia No grace period No maximum $25 (§ 61-3-39e)
Wisconsin No grace period No maximum No statute
Wyoming No grace period No maximum $30 (§ 1-1-115(a))

Security Deposit Laws

STATE MAXIMUM RETURNING STATUTES
Alabama 1 month’s rent 60 days after the lease terminates § 35-9A-201
Alaska 2 months’ rent 14 days; 30 days if deductions are made § 34.03.070
Arizona 1.5 months’ rent 14 days after the lease terminates (not including holidays/weekends) § 33-1321(D)
Arkansas 2 months’ rent 60 days after the lease terminates § 18-16-305(a)
California 2 months’ rent (unfurnished); 3 months’ rent (furnished) 21 days after tenant moves out § 1950.5
Colorado No limit 1 month; up to 2 months if stated in the lease § 38-12-103(1), § 38-12-104
Connecticut 2 months’ rent; 1 month’s rent if older than 62 15 days after receiving tenant’s new mailing address or 30 days after lease termination (whichever is later) § 47a-21
Delaware 1 month’s rent for 1-year leases only 20 days after the lease terminates § 5514
Florida No limit 15 days; 30 days if deductions are made § 83.49(3)(a)
Georgia No limit 30 days after the tenant vacates § 44-7-34(a)
Hawaii 1 month’s rent 14 days after the lease terminates § 521-44(c)
Idaho No limit 21 days; up to 30 days if stated in the lease § 6-321
Illinois No limit 30 days if deductions are made; 45 days otherwise 765 ILCS 710
Indiana No limit 45 days after the lease terminates § 32-31-3-12
Iowa 2 months’ rent 30 days after the lease terminates § 562A.12(3)(a)
Kansas 1 month’s rent (unfurnished); 1.5 months’ rent (furnished) 30 days after the lease terminates § 58-2550(b)
Kentucky No limit 60 days after the lease terminates § 383.580
Louisiana No limit 1 month after the lease terminates § 3251
Maine 2 months’ rent 30 days for fixed-term lease, 21 days for periodic leases §6032, §6033
Maryland 2 months’ rent 45 days after the lease terminates § 8-203
Massachusetts 1 month’s rent 30 days after the lease terminates Ch. 186 §15B
Michigan 1.5 months’ rent 30 days after the tenant moves out §554.602, §554.609
Minnesota No limit 3 weeks after the lease terminates § 504B.178
Mississippi No limit 45 days after the lease terminates § 89-8-21
Missouri 2 months’ rent 30 days after the lease terminates § 535.300
Montana No limit 10 days; 30 days if deductions are made § 70-25-202
Nebraska 1 month’s rent 14 days after the lease terminates § 76-1416
Nevada 3 months’ rent 30 days after the lease terminates NRS 118A.242
New Hampshire 1 month’s rent or $100, whichever is greater 30 days after the lease terminates § 540-A:6 & § 540-A:7
New Jersey 1.5 months’ rent 30 days after the lease terminates §§ 46:8-21.2, 46:8-21.1
New Mexico 1 month’s rent 30 days after the lease terminates or the tenant moves out, whichever is later § 47-8-18
New York 1 month’s rent 14 days after the tenant moves out 576/74 § 6, § 7-108(e)
North Carolina 2 months’ rent; 1.5 months’ rent for at-will leases 30 days; 60 days if deductions are made § 42-51, § 42-52
North Dakota 1 month’s rent; 2 months’ rent for pets 30 days after the lease terminates § 47-16-07.1
Ohio No limit 30 days after the lease terminates § 5321.16
Oklahoma No limit 45 days after the lease terminates § 41-115
Oregon No limit 31 days after the lease terminates § 90.300(13)
Pennsylvania 2 months’ rent 30 days after the lease terminates or the tenant moves out, whichever is earlier § 250.511a, § 250.512
Rhode Island 1 month’s rent 20 days after the lease terminates, the tenant moves out, or a forwarding address is provided, whichever is later § 34-18-19
South Carolina No limit 30 days after the lease terminates or the tenant moves out, whichever is later § 27-40-410
South Dakota 1 month’s rent 14 days; 45 days if deductions are made § 43-32-6.1, § 43-32-24
Tennessee No limit 30 days after the tenant moves out or 7 days after a new tenant moves in, whichever is earlier § 66-28-301(g)(1)
Texas No limit 30 days after the tenant moves out § 92.103(a)
Utah No limit 30 days after the tenant moves out § 57-17-3(2)
Vermont No limit 14 days; 60 days for seasonal or vacation rentals § 4461(c)
Virginia 2 months’ rent 45 days after the lease terminates § 55.1-1226
Washington No limit 21 days after the tenant moves out § 59.18.280
West Virginia No limit 60 days after the lease terminates or 45 days after a new tenant moves in, whichever is earlier § 37-6A-2
Wisconsin No limit 21 days after the lease terminates

 

§ 134.06(2)
Wyoming No limit 15 days after the landlord receives the tenant’s new address or 30 days from lease termination, whichever is earlier § 1-21-1208

Landlord’s Access

STATE Standard Access Immediate Access
Alabama 2 days’ notice (§ 35-9A-303(a), (c)) No notice required for emergencies or by court order (§ 35-9A-303(b))
Alaska 24 hours’ notice (AS 34.03.140(c)) No notice required for emergencies (AS 34.03.140(b))
Arizona 2 days’ notice (§ 33-1343(D)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 33-1343(C))
Arkansas 24 hours’ notice (§ 18-17-602) No statute.
California Must be reasonable notice; 24 hours is considered reasonable (CIV § 1954(d)(1)) No notice required for emergencies (CIV § 1954(e)(1))
Colorado No statute No statute
Connecticut Reasonable notice (§ 47a-16(c)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 47a-16(b))
Delaware 48 hours’ notice (§ 5509(b)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 5509(b))
Florida 24 hours’ notice (§ 83.53(2)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 83.53(2)(b))
Georgia No statute No statute
Hawaii 2 days’ notice (§ 521-53(b)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 521-53(b))
Idaho No statute No statute
Illinois 2 days’ notice (Chicago only) (§ 5-12-050) No statute
Indiana Reasonable notice (§ 32-31-5-6(g)) No notice required for emergencies or by court order (§ 32-31-5-6(f))
Iowa 24 hours’ notice (§ 562A.19(3) No notice required for emergencies (§ 562A.19(3)
Kansas Reasonable notice (§ 25-2557(a)) No notice is required for extreme hazards involving loss of life or severe property damage (§ 25-2557(b))
Kentucky 2 days’ notice (§ 383.615(3)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 383.615(2))
Louisiana No statute No statute
Maine 24 hours’ notice (§ 6025(2)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 6025(2))
Maryland No statute No statute
Massachusetts No notice period No statute
Michigan No statute No statute
Minnesota 24 hours’ notice (§ 504B.211, Subd. 2) No notice required for safety, to prevent injury to people or property, or for unlawful activity. (§ 504B.211, Subd. 4)
Mississippi No statute No statute
Missouri No statute No statute
Montana 24 hours’ notice (§ 70-24-312(3)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 70-24-312(2))
Nebraska 1 day’s notice (§ 76-1423(3)(a)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 76-1423(2))
Nevada 24 hours’ notice (§ 118A.330(3)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 118A.330(2))
New Hampshire Adequate notice (§ 540-A:3(V)) No notice required for emergencies or by court order (§ 540-A:3(V-d)(a))
New Jersey One day’s notice (§ 5:10-5.1(c)) No notice is required for safety or structural emergencies (§ 5:10-5.1(c))
New Mexico 24 hours’ notice (§ 47-8-24(A)(1)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 47-8-24(B))
New York No statute No statute
North Carolina No statute No statute
North Dakota Reasonable notice (§ 47-16-07.3(2)) No notice is required for emergencies or when the tenant has abandoned the property or violated the lease (§ 47-16-07.3(1))
Ohio 24 hours’ notice (§ 5321.04(8)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 5321.04(8))
Oklahoma One day’s notice (§ 41-128(C)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 41-128(B))
Oregon 24 hours’ notice (§ 90.322(1)(f)) No notice required for emergencies; if tenant is absent, notice must be provided after (§ 90.322(1)(b))
Pennsylvania No statute No statute
Rhode Island 2 days’ notice (§ 34-18-26(c)) No notice required for emergencies and to protect the property if tenant is absent for more than 7 days (§ 34-18-26(b))
South Carolina 24 hours’ notice (§ 27-40-530(c)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 27-40-530(b)(1))
South Dakota 24 hours is considered reasonable notice (§ 43-32-32) No notice required for emergencies (§ 43-32-32)
Tennessee No minimum notice period; tenant consent should be obtained (§ 66-28-403) No notice is required for emergencies or to inspect for damages if utilities shut off. (§ 66-28-403(b), (c))
Texas No statute No statute
Utah 24 hours’ notice (§ 57-22-4(2)) No statute
Vermont No minimum notice period; tenant consent should be obtained (§ 4460(a)) No notice is required if there is imminent danger to people or property (§ 4460(c))
Virginia 72 hours’ notice (§ 55.1-1229(A)(4)) No notice required for emergencies (§ 55.1-1229(A)(4))
Washington 2 days’ notice (§ 59.18.150(6)) No notice is required for emergencies or abandonment (§ 59.18.150(5))
West Virginia No statute No statute
Wisconsin 12 hours’ notice (§ 134.09(2)(a)) No notice is required for emergencies or to protect property in tenant’s absence (§ 134.09(2)(b))
Wyoming No statute No statute

How to Write

View Instructions (29 steps)

Note about colors:

  • Red – Mandatory information. The landlord must complete all red sections.
  • Yellow – Information that is optional, or is only required if a certain checkmark is selected.
  • Blue – Also optional information. Used in conjunction with yellow to show varying options.

Steps 1-4 (The Parties)

This section is used for identifying the landlord (the person that manages or owns the rental) and the tenant(s). The landlord will need to type the following information in this section:

1) – Date. The date the lease is being completed (the current date).
2)Landlord name. The full name of the landlord. This is the person that owns or manages the property.
3) – Landlord’s address. Includes the street, city, state, and ZIP code.
4)Tenant name(s). The name(s) of the tenant(s) that will be renting the property.

Step 5 (Property Address)

5) Property address. The full address of the rental property. This should include the street, unit # (if any), city/town, state, and ZIP code.

Example: 123 Rental Ave, Suite 9A, ABC City, Texas 78701.

Step 6 (Lease Type & Term)

This area is for specifying the length of the lease. The landlord can choose one of two (2) options. The first (and more common) option is “Fixed Lease,” which refers to the agreement being established for a pre-determined length of time (such as 1 year). The second option is a “Month-to-Month Lease,” which is a type of periodic contract that has no end date and renews automatically on a monthly basis until either party wishes to terminate it.

6) Lease type. Check one (1) of the two options shown. If “Fixed Lease” is selected, complete the fields marked with yellow. Enter the start and end dates, and select whether the lease will continue as a “month-to-month” agreement after the term ends OR if the tenant(s) will be required to move out.

If “Month-to-Month Lease” is selected, enter the starting date of the lease followed by the number (#) of days either party has to give in order to terminate the contract.

Steps 7 – 9 (Rent)

This provision allows the landlord to set the monthly rent ($) the tenant(s) will be required to pay.

7)Rent amount. Type the total amount ($) of rent the landlord will collect from the tenant(s).
8)Rent due day. Enter the day of the month the rent will be due. This is typically the first (1st) of every month.
9)Payment instructions. Describe how the tenant should go about paying rent (e.g., “Mail via check to [Address]” or “send via PayPal.”)

Step 10 (Late Fee)

A late fee is a monetary penalty that is billed to the tenant(s) if they are late on rent.

10) Late fee (Y/N). Select whether or not the tenant(s) will be charged a fee if they are late on rent. If the first option is selected, complete steps 10a and 10b by typing the amount ($) of the late fee, followed by the number (#) of days that must pass after the rent due date before a late fee can be issued.

Step 11 (Proration Period)

A proration period is any time the tenant will be living in the rental that doesn’t fall within one (1) full rent payment period. For example, if the tenant wanted to move into the property a couple of weeks before the official start of the lease, the landlord could require them to pay two (2) weeks’ worth of rent (known as “prorated rent”).

11)Proration period (Y/N). Place a checkmark in one (1) of the two boxes shown to indicate the proration period. If the first box was selected, enter a) the starting date of the proration period, followed by b) the amount ($) the tenant will be paying.

Note: Many states consider rent that is received upfront to be a security deposit. Because many states restrict security deposits to one (1) or two (2) months of rent, the landlord could be breaking rental laws by accepting pre-paid rent on top of a security deposit.

Step 12 (Security Deposit)

Enter the dollar ($) amount of the security deposit that the tenant(s) is/are required to pay at the start of the lease. Enter the full value of the deposit, not the amount each tenant would be required to pay. Specify the number of days the landlord has to return the deposit (less any deductions) at the end of the lease.

12)Security deposit (Y/N). Check the appropriate box to indicate whether or not the tenant(s) will be required to pay a security deposit. If the first (top) box is checked, enter a) the amount ($) of the security deposit that will be collected, followed by b) the number (#) of days the landlord will have to return the deposit once the lease term expires.

Step 13 (Returned Checks)

A “returned check” occurs if a tenant’s check bounces due to insufficient funds in their bank account. To prevent this from occurring, the landlord can charge a fee.

13) – Returned check fee (Y/N). If the landlord will require a fee ($) for bounced checks, place a checkmark in the first box and enter the amount ($) of the fee. If a fee will not be required for bounced checks, select the second (2nd) box and proceed to the next step.

Step 14 (Additional Occupants)

14) – Occupants (Y/N). If the tenant(s) will have additional person(s) living in the rental, check the first (1st) box and type the name(s) of the other occupants in the provided field. If the tenant will not be living with other occupants, check the second (2nd) box.

Step 15 (Move-in Inspection)

15) – Move-in inspection (Y/N). If the landlord and tenant(s) will be completing a move-in checklist together, select the first (1st) box. Otherwise, check the second (2nd) box.

Note: Conducting a move-in inspection is highly recommended to avoid charging the tenant(s) for the damage they didn’t cause.

Step 16 (Furnishings)

16) – Furnishings (Y/N). If the rental is furnished, check the first (1st) box and list the furnishings that will be included (e.g., “living room couch, TV set, dining table). If it is not furnished, check the second (2nd) box and head to Step 17.

Step 17 (Utilities)

17)Utilities. List any utilities that the landlord will be responsible for (if any). Any fees not included will be the tenant’s responsibility.

Step 18 (Parking)

18)Parking provided (Y/N). If the tenant(s) will be provided one (1) or more parking space(s), check the first (1st) box. Then, a) type the number (#) of spots provided, b) check the box corresponding to whether or not a fee is required, c) type the amount ($) of the fee (if any), followed by d) selecting the option that corresponds to how often the fee will need to be paid. If the tenant(s) will not be given parking, the last box (blue) should be checked.

Step 19 (Pets)

Due to pets being a potential liability for landlords, many choose to restrict (or deny) the number and types of pets tenants can have.

19) – Pets allowed (Y/N). If pets will be allowed on the premises, check the first (1st) box. Then, the landlord will need to a) type the number (#) of pets that the tenant(s) can have, b) list the type(s) of pets that are permitted, followed by c) the deposit the tenant(s) will need to provide to cover any damage caused by their pet. If pets are not allowed on the premises, the second (2nd) box should be checked.

Step 20 (Smoking Policy)

20) Smoking (Y/N). If smoking is permitted in certain areas on the premises, check the first (1st) box and specify exactly where tenants can smoke. If smoking is not allowed, check the second (2nd) box.

Step 21 (Sale of Property)

In the event the owner of the property sells the rental, the landlord can specify whether the new owner would have the power to terminate the rental agreement.

21)Right to terminate lease (Y/N). Check the first (1st) box if the new owner would have the right to terminate the rental agreement. Then, enter the number (#) of days’ notice the new owner would need to provide the tenant. Check the second (2nd) box if the new owner would not have the right to terminate the lease agreement.

Steps 22 & 23 (Notices)

22) Landlord notice address. Type the full address the tenant(s) can use to send the landlord notices and other important information.
23) Tenant notice address. Type the address that should be used for sending the tenant notices (most likely the same address as the rental property).

Step 24 (Governing Law)

24) State name. Enter the name of the state the rental property is located in.

Step 25 (Lead-Based Paint)

25) Property built before 1978 (Y/N). If the property was built prior to 1978, check the first (1st) box. The landlord will need to complete (and attach) a Lead-Based Paint Disclosure Form. If the property was built after 1978, check the second (2nd) box and proceed to the next step.

Step 26 (Additional Provisions)

26)Additional provisions. If there are any additional sections the landlord wishes to include in the agreement, they can be written in the text box provided. Alternatively, the landlord can attach an addendum if more room is required.

Step 27 (Signatures)

At a minimum, the landlord and one (1) tenant need to sign the lease.

27)Landlord name, signature, & date. The landlord will need to sign their name (with eSign or by hand), enter the date (mm/dd/yyyy), and write their full name beneath their signature.
28) – Tenant name, signature, & date. At a minimum, at least one (1) tenant will need to sign, date, and print their name on the contract.
29) – Second (2nd) tenant name, signature, & date. If a second tenant will be on the lease, they will need to sign, date, and print their name on the form.