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North Carolina Deed Forms

North Carolina deed legally transfers ownership of real estate from a grantor (old owner) to a grantee (new owner) and may include warranties to protect the property’s title. The extent to which the title is protected differs from deed to deed. A general warranty deed is the safest option for the grantee; it holds the grantor accountable for existing title encumbrances, even those originating before they acquired ownership. On the other hand, a quit claim deed provides no title assurances at the benefit of being a quick and easy way to facilitate the transfer of property.

Contents

Types (6)

Administrator Deed – Used when a property owner dies intestate (without a valid will). The estate administrator will execute this deed to transfer the decedent’s real estate.

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Deed of Trust – Transfers a grantor’s property title to a trustee to hold as loan security (collateral). The title will be returned to the grantor when the loan is repaid.

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Executor Deed – Used by an estate executor to transfer property left by a decedent who died testate (with a valid will).

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General Warranty Deed – Transfers property with a guarantee that the grantor’s ownership is valid and that the title is free from liens, claims, and all other encumbrances.

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Quit Claim Deed – Provides no title warranties or covenants to protect the grantee. The property’s title is transferred “as is.”

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Special Warranty Deed – Guarantees that the grantor has not caused any title encumbrances during their ownership, but does not warrant the title against encumbrances caused by former owners.

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