Arizona Eviction Notice Templates (6)

Arizona eviction notices are documents served on a tenant by their landlord notifying them that their lease will be terminated within the specified period of time. They’re typically delivered when the tenant has committed a violation of their lease. The notice to quit is the first step a landlord has to take before they can file an eviction suit.

Arizona Eviction Notice Templates (6)

Arizona eviction notices are documents served on a tenant by their landlord notifying them that their lease will be terminated within the specified period of time. They’re typically delivered when the tenant has committed a violation of their lease. The notice to quit is the first step a landlord has to take before they can file an eviction suit.

Last updated July 23rd, 2024

Arizona eviction notices are documents served on a tenant by their landlord notifying them that their lease will be terminated within the specified period of time. They’re typically delivered when the tenant has committed a violation of their lease. The notice to quit is the first step a landlord has to take before they can file an eviction suit.

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Eviction Notices: By Type (6)

5-Day Notice to Quit | Non-Payment – Eviction notice demanding that a tenant pay all rent due within five days of service or risk lease termination.

 

Download: PDF

Immediate Notice to Quit | Irreparable Breach – Terminates a tenancy immediately upon service from the landlord due to the tenant committing an illegal act or other irreparable breach.

 

Download: PDF

5-Day Notice to Quit | Non-Compliance Affecting Health and Safety – This notice gives the tenant five days to remedy a health or safety non-compliance they committed.

Download: PDF

10-Day Notice to Quit | Second Non-Compliance Affecting Health and Safety – A notice demanding a tenant to hand over possession of the premises within 10 days because they have committed a second health and safety violation.

Download: PDF

10-Day Notice to Quit | Material Non-Compliance – Informs a tenant that they have 10 days to cure a material non-compliance that they have caused or their lease will be terminated.

 

Download: PDF

30-Day Notice to Terminate | Month-to-Month Lease – Terminates a tenancy between a landlord and their tenant. (Can be used by either party.)

 

Download: PDF, Word (.docx), OpenDocument

Notice Requirements

    • Grace Period for Rent – Not mentioned in state statutes.
    • Non-Payment of Rent – 5 days.[1]
    • Lease Non-Compliance – 10 days.[2]
    • Periodic Tenancy Termination – 30 days.[3]
    • Illegal Activity – Immediate.[4]
    • Intentional Damage to Property – 5 days.[5]

How to Evict a Tenant in Alaska

Step 2 – Complaint and Summons

If the tenant does not comply with the notice to quit by curing the violation (if applicable) or moving out, the landlord can start the eviction process. They will need to complete a Complaint and Summons and file them with the justice court where the property is located. Copies should be made of these forms for the court, the landlord, and the tenant.

Step 3 – Serve the Tenant

The landlord must deliver to the tenant copies of the Complaint, the Summons, a Residential Eviction Information Sheet, and the portion of the lease that pertains to the tenant’s violation or a copy of the accounting charges (if late rent payment is the violation). A court constable, the county sheriff’s department, or a private process server must deliver these documents to the tenant at least two days before the hearing date.

Step 4 – Tenant’s Answer

Once the tenant has received all the documents, they can download, complete, and file an Answer form with the court. A copy of this form must be delivered to the landlord.

Step 5 – Hearing

On the day of the hearing, the landlord and tenant must appear before a justice of the peace (judge). The justice will ask the tenant if they deny the case against them. If they do not deny the violations, the justice will order a judgment (Step 7). If the tenant doesn’t believe the landlord has proper grounds for eviction, the justice may call for a trial to be held (Step 6).

Step 6 – Trial (If Applicable)

At the trial, the justice will hear testimony from both parties to determine the full scope of the situation. If the tenant wins, they can maintain possession of the rental unit and may be awarded filing fees, court costs, and attorneys’ fees. If the ruling is in favor of the landlord, the judge may order the tenant to pay the landlord any unpaid rent, costs of damages, court fees, and attorneys’ fees, and they may force them to hand over possession of the residence to the landlord.

Step 7 – Judgment and Writ of Restitution

The justice will complete a Judgment form, which orders the losing party to pay a certain amount of money to the prevailing party. Furthermore, if the landlord has won the case, they may regain possession of the property and claim monetary judgment by filing a Writ of Restitution with the court. The Writ demands that the tenant vacate the premises before a certain date and time, which may not be sooner than five days after judgment has been ordered.